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Authority record

Aberfoyle Junior Secondary School

  • ED/AB1
  • Corporate body
  • c. 1951 – 1974

Aberfoyle originally had a Public School from the late 19th century. Aberfoyle Junior Secondary School was in operation from c. 1951 and closed in July 1974 with pupils transferred to McLaren High School in Callander. By the 1930s, the main structure of Scottish secondary schooling had settled into a pattern of three-year ‘junior secondary’ and five-year ‘senior secondary’ courses. Junior Secondary’s were intended to prepare people for training and work. Senior Secondary’s were intended to lead to the professions either directly or through university. Allocation of pupils between these courses was mainly on the basis of tests of intelligence and of attainment (in English, arithmetic and mathematics) taken in the final year of primary school.

Aberfoyle Kirk Session

  • CH2/704
  • Corporate body
  • 1740 - 1963

Historically, Aberfoyle Church belonged to the Abbey of Inchmahome. It was in the Presbytery of Dunblane and later the Presbytery of Stirling (for some time the Presbytery of Stirling and Dunblane). John Honeyman designed the present parish church building in 1869-1870, which replaced the Old Kirk of Aberfoyle which was situated on the south bank of the River Forth. (The old church was rebuilt in 1744 and repaired 1839). The new church was enlarged in 1883-84 to include transepts, and in 1974 a stained glass window by Gordon Webster was added. A bell originally presented to the Old Parish Church by the Duke of Montrose hangs in a small structure near the East gable. There is a two-manual pipe organ (1887) by Bryceson Brothers, London. In 1983 Aberfoyle Parish Church was linked with the Port of Menteith Parish Church.

Aberfoyle Ministers include the Gaelic scholar and author, Rev Robert Kirk (1644-1692) who was minister in the Old Parish Church, Aberfoyle 1685 – 1692. Kirk was the author of various Gaelic and English translations and publications and perhaps best known for his work ‘The Secret Commonwealth’(1691, published 1815) regarding fairies and other supernatural beings. Kirk was found dead on Doon Hill in 1692 which was known locally as a ‘fairy knowe’ – the tradition is that he was walking on the knowe when he sank down and disappeared. Kirk’s remains are buried in Aberfoyle [see Fasti, Vol 4 Presbytery of Dunblane, p334-335].

Aberfoyle Parish

  • PR/AB
  • Corporate body
  • 1845 - 1975

Prior to 1845, most local administration was provided by the kirk session of the parish. Details of this may be found in the minutes and accounts of the ecclesiastical parish at CH2/704. In 1845 the Poor Law (Scotland) Act set up parochial boards in each ecclesiastical parish in Scotland with a Board of Supervision established in Edinburgh to oversee the administration or relief for the poor. This produced a whole new series of records related to the provision of help for those in need. As well as this function, the parish was also responsible for other aspects of local administration such as recreation grounds, refuse collection and lighting. After 1925, care of local burial grounds was transferred to the parish authorities and at this time, all existing pre-1925 lair and burial records were given over to the care of the parish council. The Local Government (Scotland) Act of 1894 replaced the parochial boards with parish councils although the system of administration remained broadly the same. The 1929 Local Government (Scotland) Act transferred the functions of the parish councils to the district councils of the local county council. Aberfoyle Parish fell under the jurisdiction of Perth Western District Council. In 1948, all provision for the poor became the responsibility of the National Assistance Board with the establishment of the Welfare State in that year.

Aberfoyle Slate Quarries School

  • ED/AB2
  • Corporate body
  • 1921 – 1934

Aberfoyle Slate Quarries School opened on 2nd September 1921 with Miss Morton the Head Teacher. The last entry in the log book was 4th May 1934.

Allan’s Primary School

  • ED/SG1
  • Corporate body
  • 1797 -

John Allan, writer in Stirling, died on 25th November 1728 and, by a deed of mortification, left 30,000 merks for the education of poor boys who were sons of members of the Seven Incorporated Trades. The capital was invested in land, mainly the lands of Taylortoun, and a house with furnishings was bought and installed on the mortification in 1741 as accommodation for the boys. In 1777, provision was made for the boys to be taught in the hospital house with a newly appointed school master.

In 1797, a site for a new school and house was bought on Spittal Street. The new school was a financial strain on the Patrons of Allan’s Mortification and in return for a grant towards the building and furnishing of a large school room on the ground floor, the Patrons agreed to make it a public non-denominational school under the Patronage and direction of the Magistrates of the Town Council. Despite this, in 1872, the Counsel’s opinion was that Allan’s School was not a Burgh School under the new Education Act. In 1874, the Patrons consequently decided to lease the building to the School Board in return for the maintaining of the fabric, payment of rates and insurance and continuation of the name of Allan’s School.

The school still operates today. It occupies the same site, augmented by a neighbouring feu and was rebuilt in 1888-1890 and refurbished 1991.

Ardeonaig Primary School

  • ED/KE1
  • Corporate body
  • 1873 - 1986

Ardeonaig Public School opened on 21st November 1873. The school closed on 27th June 1986 with pupils transferred to Killin School and Kenmore School.

Arnprior Primary School

  • ED/KN1
  • Corporate body
  • 1876 - 1997

Arnprior Public School formally opened on 16th October 1876. Arnprior Primary School closed in 1997.

Baldernock Parish

  • PR/BD
  • Corporate body
  • 1845 - 1975

Prior to 1845, most local administration was provided by the kirk session of the parish. There are no ecclesiastical parish records for Baldernock held at Stirling Council Archives. In 1845, The Poor Law (Scotland) Act set up parochial boards in each ecclesiastical parish in Scotland with a Board of Supervision established in Edinburgh to oversee the administration of relief for the poor. This produced a whole new series of records related to the provision of help for those in need. As well as this function, the parish was also responsible for other aspects of local administration such as recreation grounds, refuse collection and lighting. After 1925, care of local burial grounds was transferred to the parish authorities and at this time, all existing pre-1925 lair and burial records were given over to the care of the parish council. The Local Government (Scotland) Act of 1894 replaced the parochial boards with parish councils although the system of administration remained broadly the same. The 1929 Local Government (Scotland) Act transferred the functions of the parish councils to the district councils of the local county council. Baldernock Parish fell under the jurisdiction of Stirling Western No. 3 District Council. In 1948, all provision for the poor became the responsibility of the National Assistance Board with the establishment of the Welfare State in that year.

Balfron High School

  • ED/BA1
  • Corporate body
  • c. 1890 -

Balfron High School grew out of the old Parish School of Balfron. In 1919, the school became an intermediate, or "Higher Grade" school, and additional building was constructed. In 1925, it was upgraded to a full six-year secondary school and the name changed to Balfron High School. For 125 years, the main school buildings were situated on a rather restricted site between Cotton Street and Roman Road. In August 2001, a new building was completed.

Balfron Parish

  • PR/BA
  • Corporate body
  • 1845 - 2012

Prior to 1845, most local administration was provided by the kirk session of the parish. Details of this may be found in the minutes and accounts of the ecclesiastical parish at CH2/1467. In 1845, The Poor Law (Scotland) Act set up parochial boards in each ecclesiastical parish in Scotland with a Board of Supervision established in Edinburgh to oversee the administration of relief for the poor. This produced a whole new series of records related to the provision of help for those in need. As well as this function, the parish was also responsible for other aspects of local administration such as recreation grounds, refuse collection and lighting. After 1925, care of local burial grounds was transferred to the parish authorities and at this time, all existing pre-1925 lair and burial records were given over to the care of the parish council. The Local Government (Scotland) Act of 1894 replaced the parochial boards with parish councils although the system of administration remained broadly the same. The 1929 Local Government (Scotland) Act transferred the functions of the parish councils to the district councils of the local county council. Balfron Parish fell under the jurisdiction of Stirling Western No. 2 District Council. In 1948, all provision for the poor became the responsibility of the National Assistance Board with the establishment of the Welfare State in that year.

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