Showing 265 results

Authority record

Alloa Outport and District

  • CE67
  • Corporate body
  • 1718 -

The Scottish Board of Customs was established following the Act of Union of 1707. In 1722 this was replaced by a single Board of Customs (9 Geo.I c.21), but some commissioners continued to reside in Edinburgh for the transaction of Scottish business. In 1742 an independent Scottish Board of Customs was re-established but was again replaced in 1823 by a unified board for the United Kingdom (4 Geo.IV c.23). Certain powers were delegated to a subordinate board in Scotland which was formally abolished in 1833 (3 & 4 Will.IV. c.51).

The administration of excise in Scotland after 1707 was entrusted to Commissioners appointed in 1723. The administration of salt duties, however, was the responsibility of the Scottish Commissioners of Customs until 1798. In 1823 the administration of the excise throughout the United Kingdom was entrusted to a single board, certain powers being delegated to a subordinate board in Scotland (4 Geo. IV c. 23). The constitution of this subordinate board was modified in 1829 (10 Geo. IV c. 32) and it ceased to function in 1830. In 1849 the Board of Excise was amalgamated with the Board of Stamps and Taxes to form the Board of Commissioners of Inland Revenue. In 1909, (8 Edward VII c. 16) responsibility for excise duties was transferred from the Inland Revenue to the Board of Customs, which was re-named the Board of Customs and Excise.

The local work of the Boards of Customs and Excise was carried out by staff stationed in customs outports or excise districts. Although in many instances officials from both Boards were stationed in the same locations, the administrative structures of the two Boards were not identical. The Customs Board established outports which reported directly to the Board in either Edinburgh or London, and which in some cases had supervisory responsibility for subordinate ports or creeks. Excise was administered by local collections which were sub-divided into districts and divisions. Although the districts and divisions were subordinate to the collection, in many instances they also communicated directly with the Board in Edinburgh or London.

In addition to customs and excise work, local officers frequently maintained shipping registers and sea fishing boat registers on behalf of the Registrar-General of Seamen and Shipping.

Ardeonaig Primary School

  • ED/KE1
  • Corporate body
  • 1873 - 1986

Ardeonaig Public School opened on 21st November 1873. The school closed on 27th June 1986 with pupils transferred to Killin School and Kenmore School.

Arnprior Primary School

  • ED/KN1
  • Corporate body
  • 1876 - 1997

Arnprior Public School formally opened on 16th October 1876. Arnprior Primary School closed in 1997.

Baldernock Parish

  • PR/BD
  • Corporate body
  • 1845 - 1975

Prior to 1845, most local administration was provided by the kirk session of the parish. There are no ecclesiastical parish records for Baldernock held at Stirling Council Archives. In 1845, The Poor Law (Scotland) Act set up parochial boards in each ecclesiastical parish in Scotland with a Board of Supervision established in Edinburgh to oversee the administration of relief for the poor. This produced a whole new series of records related to the provision of help for those in need. As well as this function, the parish was also responsible for other aspects of local administration such as recreation grounds, refuse collection and lighting. After 1925, care of local burial grounds was transferred to the parish authorities and at this time, all existing pre-1925 lair and burial records were given over to the care of the parish council. The Local Government (Scotland) Act of 1894 replaced the parochial boards with parish councils although the system of administration remained broadly the same. The 1929 Local Government (Scotland) Act transferred the functions of the parish councils to the district councils of the local county council. Baldernock Parish fell under the jurisdiction of Stirling Western No. 3 District Council. In 1948, all provision for the poor became the responsibility of the National Assistance Board with the establishment of the Welfare State in that year.

Balfron High School

  • ED/BA1
  • Corporate body
  • c. 1890 -

Balfron High School grew out of the old Parish School of Balfron. In 1919, the school became an intermediate, or "Higher Grade" school, and additional building was constructed. In 1925, it was upgraded to a full six-year secondary school and the name changed to Balfron High School. For 125 years, the main school buildings were situated on a rather restricted site between Cotton Street and Roman Road. In August 2001, a new building was completed.

Balfron Parish

  • PR/BA
  • Corporate body
  • 1845 - 2012

Prior to 1845, most local administration was provided by the kirk session of the parish. Details of this may be found in the minutes and accounts of the ecclesiastical parish at CH2/1467. In 1845, The Poor Law (Scotland) Act set up parochial boards in each ecclesiastical parish in Scotland with a Board of Supervision established in Edinburgh to oversee the administration of relief for the poor. This produced a whole new series of records related to the provision of help for those in need. As well as this function, the parish was also responsible for other aspects of local administration such as recreation grounds, refuse collection and lighting. After 1925, care of local burial grounds was transferred to the parish authorities and at this time, all existing pre-1925 lair and burial records were given over to the care of the parish council. The Local Government (Scotland) Act of 1894 replaced the parochial boards with parish councils although the system of administration remained broadly the same. The 1929 Local Government (Scotland) Act transferred the functions of the parish councils to the district councils of the local county council. Balfron Parish fell under the jurisdiction of Stirling Western No. 2 District Council. In 1948, all provision for the poor became the responsibility of the National Assistance Board with the establishment of the Welfare State in that year.

Balfron Primary School

  • ED/BA2
  • Corporate body
  • 1875 -

Balfron Primary School serves the village of Balfron and the surrounding rural area. The present building was opened in 1981 to replace the old local primary school which opened on 6th September 1875. A three classroom extension and nursery was completed in September 2003. The school is also part of the High School Campus.

Balquhidder Parish

  • PR/BQ
  • Corporate body
  • 1845 - 1975

Prior to 1845, most local administration was provided by the kirk session of the parish. Details of this may be found in the minutes and accounts of the ecclesiastical parish at CH2/469. In 1845 the Poor Law (Scotland) Act set up parochial boards in each ecclesiastical parish in Scotland with a Board of Supervision established in Edinburgh to oversee the administration or relief for the poor. This produced a whole new series of records related to the provision of help for those in need. As well as this function, the parish was also responsible for other aspects of local administration such as recreation grounds, refuse collection and lighting. After 1925, care of local burial grounds was transferred to the parish authorities and at this time, all existing pre-1925 lair and burial records were given over to the care of the parish council. The Local Government (Scotland) Act of 1894 replaced the parochial boards with parish councils although the system of administration remained broadly the same. The 1929 Local Government (Scotland) Act transferred the functions of the parish councils to the district councils of the local county council. Balquhidder Parish fell under the jurisdiction of Perth Western District Council. In 1948, all provision for the poor became the responsibility of the National Assistance Board with the establishment of the Welfare State in that year.

Balquhidder Primary School

  • ED/BQ1
  • Corporate body
  • 1873-1994

A new school house was first proposed in Balquhidder in 1869 by the Heritors of Balquhidder. This was to replace the old school buildings in the village. Land was offered by David Carnegie to help form a Schoolmaster’s garden in Kirkton farm and Balquhidder Public School opened on the 4th April 1873. The school closed on 31st March 1994.

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