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Authority record

Perth County Council

  • PCC
  • Corporate body
  • 1890-1975

Perth County Council was an elected body established, along with other county councils, by the Local Government (Scotland) Act 1889 (52 & 53 Vict., c. 50). County councils inherited almost all the functions of commissioners of supply, and those of county road trusts and local authorities set up under the Contagious Diseases (Animals) Acts. They also took over some administrative powers from the justices of the peace, but not their licensing or judicial functions. The responsibilities of the Commissioners of Supply for police matters were transferred to standing joint committees made up of commissioners of supply and county councillors. County councils were required to appoint full-time county medical officers of health and sanitary inspectors, and the local public health functions of parochial boards in landward areas were transferred to district committees of the county councils. The Local Government (Scotland) Act 1929 (19 & 20 Geo. V, c. 25) abolished district committees, standing joint committees, commissioners of supply, parish councils, education authorities and other bodies, and transferred all or most of their functions to county councils. The main impact was in the areas of the poor law and education. County councils were now responsible for education everywhere except in the four counties of cities, and for the poor law and public health except in the counties of cities and large burghs. The act also required the councils to prepare a scheme for coverage of their areas by district councils which might have certain functions delegated to them by the County Council. Under the 1929 Act Perth County Council was combined for most, but not all, purposes with Kinross County Council to form Perth and Kinross Joint County Council. Combined services originally included education, poor law, roads, police, major health services, lunacy and mental deficiency. Perth County Council was to remain responsible for minor services and for rating purposes as well as any services delegated by the Joint County Council. County councils were abolished in 1975 and their powers transferred to regional, islands and district councils (Local Government (Scotland) Act 1973, c.65). Tayside Regional Council was the main successor authority to Perth County Council, although part of southern Perthshire was encompassed within the boundaries of Central Regional Council.
From 1890 to 1930, Perth County Council devolved some responsibilities to District Committees (including roads and public health), including the Western District Committee which served an area now part of the current Stirling Council area. Other responsibilities were held separately by Burgh Councils and by Parish Councils (including burials and poor relief).
Under the 1929 Act, District Committees and Parish Councils were abolished. From 1930, these responsibilities were devolved by Perth & Kinross Joint County Council to District Councils and Burgh Councils. The Western District Council and Callander, Doune and Dunblane Burgh Council areas fall within the current Stirling Council area. The Western District covered the civil parishes of Aberfoyle, Balquhidder, Callander, Dunblane and Lecropt, Killin, Kilmadock, Kincardine, and Port of Menteith.

Perth Western District Council

  • PR/PW
  • Corporate body
  • 1930 - 1975

Prior to 1845, most local administration was provided by the kirk session of individual parishes. Details of this can be found within the CH2 holdings for the ecclesiastical parishes within the Perthshire Western area. In 1845 the Poor Law (Scotland) Act set up parochial boards in each ecclesiastical parish in Scotland with a Board of Supervision established in Edinburgh to oversee the administration or relief for the poor. This produced a whole new series of records related to the provision of help for those in need. As well as this function, the parish was also responsible for other aspects of local administration such as recreation grounds, refuse collection and lighting. After 1925, care of local burial grounds was transferred to the parish authorities and at this time, all existing pre-1925 lair and burial records were given over to the care of the parish council. The Local Government (Scotland) Act of 1894 replaced the parochial boards with parish councils although the system of administration remained broadly the same. The 1929 Local Government (Scotland) Act transferred the functions of the parish councils to the district councils of the local county council. Perthshire Western District covered the civil parishes of Aberfoyle, Balquhidder, Callander, Dunblane and Lecropt, Killin, Kilmadock, Kincardine, and Port of Menteith, which includes the towns and villages of Tyndrum, Crianlarich, Glendochart, Doune, Deanston, Drumvaich, Buchany, Bridge of Teith, Blairdrummond, Thornhill, Lochearnhead, Strathyre, Kinlochard, Ruskie, Dykehead and Gartmore. In 1948, all provision for the poor became the responsibility of the National Assistance Board with the establishment of the Welfare State in that year.

Port of Menteith Kirk Session

  • CH3/1300
  • Corporate body
  • 1697 - 1959

A church has existed in Port of Menteith from the 13th century and was linked historically to the Augustinian Priory of Inchmahome. The present church was designed by John Honeyman and built in 1876-78 to replace the previous building of 1771. The current church features a Stephen Adam stained glass trefoil window from 1879 depicting Faith, Hope and Charity, gifted in his memory by the family of James MacOran Campbell, grandfather of Henry Campbell Bannerman, Prime Minister 1905. On the west of the graveyard is the Graham of Gartmore Mausoleum by William Stirling, c. 1817. Port of Menteith Parish Church linked with Aberfoyle Parish Church in 1983, and is currently in Stirling Presbytery.

Port of Menteith Parish

  • PR/PM
  • Corporate body
  • 1845 - 1975

Prior to 1845, most local administration was provided by the kirk session of the parish. Details of this may be found in the minutes and accounts of the ecclesiastical parish at CH2/1300. In 1845, the Poor Law (Scotland) set up parochial boards in each ecclesiastical parish for Scotland with a Board of Supervision established in Edinburgh to oversee the administration of relief for the poor. This produced a whole new series of records related to the provision of help for those in need. As well as this function, the parish was also responsible for other aspects of local administration such as recreation grounds, refuse collection and lighting. The Local Government (Scotland) Act of 1894 replaced the parochial boards with parish councils although the system of administration remained broadly the same.

After 1925, care of local burial grounds was transferred to the parish authorities and at this time, all existing pre-1925 lair and burial records were given over to the care of the parish council. The 1929 Local Government (Scotland) Act transferred the functions of the parish councils to the district councils of the local county council. Port of Menteith Parish fell under the jurisdiction of Perth Western District Council. In 1948, all provision for the poor became the responsibility of the National Assistance Board with the establishment of the Welfare State in that year.

Port of Menteith Primary School

  • ED/PM2
  • Corporate body
  • 1697 -

The Port of Menteith Kirk Session Minutes confirm that the first parochial schoolmaster in Port of Menteith was Mr Alexander Garioch in 1697. The school is still in operation today.

Presbytery of Stirling

  • CH2/722
  • Corporate body
  • 1581 – 1975

The General Assembly of the Church of Scotland of 1581 set down a pattern of presbyteries, and an Act of the Scottish parliament (c. 8, 1592) which finally established the Presbyterian system in Scotland made reference to the powers of the Presbytery. The Presbytery superintends the kirk sessions and ecclesiastical activity within its boundaries, and also elects the ministers and elders who are to attend the annual General Assembly. As a court presbyteries have the power of review of decisions taken by kirk sessions or congregations. Its membership comprises ministers, certain elders and (from 1990) members of the diaconate within its bounds. The Presbytery’s main officials are a moderator (effectively chairman), clerk and treasurer. Presbyteries meet more or less monthly. The General Assembly has the power to unite, disjoin or erect presbyteries. A very significant adjustment was undertaken in 1976 on the reorganisation of local government in Scotland. Presbyteries were the level below the synods, but synods were dissolved as from 1 January 1993.The Presbytery includes amongst its tasks the oversight of records (e.g. kirk session minutes, accounts, communion rolls) produced by each Kirk Session. Within each five-year period it will formally visit each congregation. When a congregation lacks a minister, then the Presbytery has an important role in ensuring that the spiritual needs of the congregation are fully met, fulfilling its responsibility for the spiritual well-being for all parishes within its bounds. The Presbytery will appoint an interim moderator to make arrangements for continuing services and the election of a new minister. Presbyteries have the duty of caring for the well-being of its ministers, and for those who are candidates for the ministry. The Presbytery of Stirling was erected in 1581 and as such it was one of thirteen initial centres for establishing presbyteries. At first its jurisdiction covered Dunblane but in 1586 Stirling and Dunblane were separated into two distinct presbyteries, to be part of a new Synod of Dunblane. Two years later they became part of the Synod of Perth. The Presbyteries of Stirling and Dunblane were later united and after 1975 the Presbytery was known as the Presbytery of Stirling.

Primrose, Archibald John, 1783 – 1868, 4th Earl of Rosebery

  • P0036
  • Person
  • 1783 – 1868

Archibald John Primrose was born at Dalmeny Castle, West Lothian, on 14 October 1783. He was educated at Pembroke College, Cambridge, and graduated in 1804. In the Commons he represented the burgh of Helston in 1805-1806, and Cashel in 1806-1807, and in 1814 he inherited the earldom of Rosebery from his father. In 1828 he became a Peer, taking the title Baron Rosebery of Rosebery, Midlothian. As a Liberal he took a keen interest in the Reform Bill 1832, and earlier, in 1831, he became a Privy Councillor. In 1840, Rosebery was made a Knight of the Order of the Thistle, and from 1843 to 1863 he was Lord-Lieutenant of West Lothian. Archibald John Primrose, 4th Earl of Rosebery, died on 4 March 1868. His grandson, Archibald Philip Primrose, Lord Dalmeny, 5th Earl of Rosebery, became a British Prime Minister.

Primrose, Archibald, 1809 – 1851, Lord and Member of Parliament

  • P0037
  • Person
  • 1809 – 1851

Archibald Primrose, Lord Dalmeny (2 October 1809 – 23 January 1851) was a Scottish Liberal politician. Dalmeny was a supporter of the Reform Act 1832, and became a Member of Parliament for Stirling Burghs in the elections held that year after the passage of the bill. From 25 April 1835 until the fall of Melbourne's Second Government in 1841, Dalmeny was a Civil Lord of the Admiralty. In Parliament, he opposed both the secret ballot and the income tax. He did not contest the seat in 1847, and left Parliament.

Queen Victoria School

  • ED/DL4
  • Corporate body
  • 1908 -

Queen Victoria School, Dunblane, was built through subscriptions from personnel serving in the armed forces and other interested parties. The school was primarily created in memory of those who had died in the South African wars of the late 19th Century.

The school opened on 28th September 1908 by King Edward VII who also laid the foundation stone situated at the schools chapel. The school was originally only open to boys with inclusion of girls in 1996

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