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Authority record

Drumbeg School for Girls

  • ED/KI1
  • Corporate body
  • 1919 - c. 1939

Drumbeg School was active between 1919 and 1939. The school was owned and operated by sisters Helen and Isobel Wallis-Smith at Drumbeg Cottage. It catered for girls between the ages of six and thirteen as day or weekly boarding pupils. It catered for 59 pupils when it first opened in 1919.

Drumvaich School

  • ED/CA3
  • Corporate body
  • 1919 - 1947

Drumvaich School was built c. 1870. The school closed in March 1943. The Schoolhouse continued to be let out by the Education Authority until 1947.

Drymen Industrial School

  • ED/DR2
  • Corporate body
  • c. 1850 - c. 1890

The Duke of Montrose donated a building for a school of Industry in Drymen situated on 1 Old Gartmore Road, c. 1850.

Drymen Parish

  • PR/DR
  • Corporate body
  • 1845-1975

Prior to 1845, most local administration was provided by the kirk session of the parish. Details of this may be found in the minutes and accounts of the ecclesiastical parish at CH2/1229. In 1845 the Poor Law (Scotland) Act set up parochial boards in each ecclesiastical parish in Scotland with a Board of Supervision established in Edinburgh to oversee the administration or relief for the poor. This produced a whole new series of records related to the provision of help for those in need. As well as this function, the parish was also responsible for other aspects of local administration such as recreation grounds, refuse collection and lighting. After 1925, care of local burial grounds was transferred to the parish authorities and at this time, all existing pre-1925 lair and burial records were given over to the care of the parish council. The Local Government (Scotland) Act of 1894 replaced the parochial boards with parish councils although the system of administration remained broadly the same. The 1929 Local Government (Scotland) Act transferred the functions of the parish councils to the district councils of the local county council. Drymen Parish fell under the jurisdiction of Stirling Western No 1 District Council. In 1948, all provision for the poor became the responsibility of the National Assistance Board with the establishment of the Welfare State in that year.

Drymen Public School

  • ED/DR3
  • Corporate body
  • c. 1874 -

Drymen Primary School has been in operation since c.1874 to the present day. The current school building on Old Gartmore Road was opened in May 1991 and further developed during 1997/1998.

Dunblane & Lecropt Parish

  • PR/DL
  • Corporate body
  • 1845 - 1975

Prior to 1845, most local administration was provided by the kirk session of each parish. Details of this may be found in the minutes and accounts of the ecclesiastical parishes at CH2/101 for Dunblane and CH2/731 for Lecropt. In 1845 the Poor Law (Scotland) Act set up parochial boards in each ecclesiastical parish in Scotland with a Board of Supervision established in Edinburgh to oversee the administration or relief for the poor. This produced a whole new series of records related to the provision of help for those in need. As well as this function, the parish was also responsible for other aspects of local administration such as recreation grounds, refuse collection and lighting. The Local Government (Scotland) Act of 1894 replaced the parochial boards with parish councils although the system of administration remained broadly the same.

The separate parishes of Dunblane and Lecropt were united in 1898, under Order XXXVIII issued under section 51 of the Local Government (Scotland) Act, 1889 and section 46 of the Local Government (Scotland) Act, 1894. This created the new joint parish of Dunblane and Lecropt. This means that for the years prior to 1898 there are separate minutes for Dunblane and Lecropt Parochial Boards and Parish Councils covering the same period.

After 1925, care of local burial grounds was transferred to the parish authorities and at this time, all existing pre-1925 lair and burial records were given over to the care of the parish council. The 1929 Local Government (Scotland) Act transferred the functions of the parish councils to the district councils of the local county council. Dunblane & Lecropt Parish fell under the jurisdiction of Perthshire Western District. In 1948, all provision for the poor became the responsibility of the National Assistance Board with the establishment of the Welfare State in that year.

Dunblane Burgh

  • BDU
  • Corporate body
  • 1870 - 1975

Dunblane is an ancient town 6 miles from Stirling, its cathedral is said to have been founded in the early 7th century. It was possibly a burgh for a period before the 15th century, with the Earl of Kinnoull for superior, and in 1500 was given the status of a city by James IV (1473-1513). After the Reformation the town went into decline but revived during the 19th century, becoming a noted tourist resort and its cathedral was renovated. Dunblane was created a police burgh in 1870 under the General Police and Improvement (Scotland) Act 1862 (25 & 26 Vict., c. 101), but, due to irregularities with elections held in 1875, went into abeyance in 1876 and was reconstituted in 1878.

Under the Act the administration of the burgh was to be carried out by police commissioners who were responsible for the cleansing, lighting, policing and public health of the burgh. Under the Town Councils (Scotland) Act 1900 (63 & 64 Vict., c. 49) the police commissioners were replaced by Dunblane Town Council in January 1901. Dunblane Town Council was abolished in 1975 under the Local Government (Scotland) Act 1973 (c. 65). Its powers were assumed by Central Regional Council and Stirling District Council. These in turn were replaced by Stirling Council in 1996 under the Local Government etc. (Scotland) Act 1994 (c. 39).

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