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Authority record

Stirling County Council

  • C0001
  • Corporate body
  • 1890 - 1975

Stirling County Council was an elected body established by the Local Government (Scotland) Act 1889 (52 & 53 Vict., c. 50). County Councils inherited almost all the functions of commissioners of supply, and those of county road trusts and local authorities set up under the Contagious Diseases (Animals) Acts. They also took over some administrative powers from the justices of the peace, but not their licensing or judicial functions.

The responsibilities of the commissioners of supply for police matters were transferred to standing joint committees made up of commissioners of supply and county councillors. County councils were required to appoint full-time county medical officers of health and sanitary inspectors, and the local public health functions of parochial boards in landward areas were transferred to district committees of the county councils.

The Local Government (Scotland) Act 1929 (19 & 20 Geo. V, c.25) abolished district committees, standing joint committees, commissioners of supply, parish councils, education authorities and other bodies, and transferred all or most of their functions to county councils. The main impact was in the areas of the poor law and education. County councils were now responsible for education everywhere except in the four counties of cities, and for the poor law and public health except in the counties of cities and large burghs. The act also required the councils to prepare a scheme for coverage of their areas by district councils which might have certain functions delegated to them by the county council.

County councils were abolished in 1975 and their powers transferred to regional, islands and district councils (Local Government (Scotland) Act 1973, c.65). The majority of the former Stirling County Council area was incorporated within Central Regional Council, the remainder coming under Strathclyde Regional Council.

Stirling County Council District Committees

  • C0002
  • Corporate body
  • 1889 - 1929

District committees in Scotland were formed under the Local Government (Scotland) Act 1889 (52 & 53 Vict., c.50). They were composed of county councillors from the area together with one representative from each parochial board (later parish council) and one from each burgh, and were responsible for roads and for public health administration out with burghs. District committees could also appoint a sub-committee for the management and maintenance of water supply works or drainage in a special district (Local Government (Scotland) Act 1889, 52 & 53 Vict., c.50).

The Local Government (Scotland) Act 1894 (57 & 58 Vict., c.58), provided for the formation by county councils or district committees of special lighting districts and special scavenging districts. Such a district, normally a local area within a parish, would be able to adopt the clauses for the provision of street lighting and the lighting of common stairs, passages and courts, contained in the Burgh Police (Scotland) Act 1892 (55 & 56 Vict., c.55).

District committees were abolished by the Local Government (Scotland) Act 1929 (19 & 20 Geo. V, c.25). Special water supply districts and drainage districts survived successive reforms and were only finally abolished by the Water (Scotland) Act 1949 (12 & 13 Geo. VI, c.31) and the Sewerage (Scotland) Act 1968 (c.47). By that date, however, many of them had already been abolished or merged by the county councils.

Stirling Burgh

  • C0003
  • Corporate body
  • c.1124 - 1975

Created by a Charter of King David I sometime between 1124 and 1127. First extant Charter that of David II dated 1360. The creation of a Royal Burgh granted various privileges to the Town including trading rights, the freedom to elect a Town Council, the right to hold a Burgal Court and to build defensive walls and gates. In 1857, Stirling became a Police Burgh under the General Police (Scotland) Act 1850 (13 & 14 Vict., c.33). Under the provisions of this Act, some Burgh administration was to be carried out by the Police Commissioners who were responsible for cleansing, policing and public health. However, they were not responsible for lighting, the Stirling Gas Company having been founded in 1825, or water, which was the responsibility of the Stirling Water Commission founded in 1848. The Burgh Police (Scotland) Act of 1891 and the Town Councils (Scotland) Act of 1900 separated the administrative and policing functions and allowed Stirling to retain its own police force. The Town Council was abolished by the Local Government (Scotland) Act 1973 (c. 65) and ceased to exist in April 1975. Its various powers were assumed by Central Regional Council and Stirling District Council. These in turn were replaced by Stirling Council under the provisions of the Local Government etc (Scotland) Act 1994 (c.39) in 1996.

Bridge of Allan Burgh

  • C0004
  • Corporate body
  • 1870 - 1975

Bridge of Allan, a town less that three miles from the centre of Stirling, was created a police burgh in 1870 under the General Police and Improvement (Scotland) Act 1862 (25 & 26 Vict., c. 101). Under the Act the administration of the burgh was to be carried out by police commissioners who were responsible for the cleansing, lighting, policing and public health of the burgh. Bridge of Allan was at that time a growing Victorian town, famed for its location and as a spa resort. Its population grew from 1803 in 1861 to 3055 in 1871. During the 20th century it continued to attract tourists and also became the location for the University of Stirling. Under the Town Councils (Scotland) Act 1900 (63 & 64 Vict., c. 49) the police commissioners were replaced by the Town Council in January 1901. Bridge of Allan Town Council was abolished in 1975 under the Local Government (Scotland) Act 1973 (c. 65). Its powers were assumed by Central Regional Council and Stirling District Council. These in turn were replaced by Stirling Council in 1996 under the Local Government etc. (Scotland) Act 1994 (c. 39).

Doune Burgh

  • C0005
  • Corporate body
  • 1890 - 1975

Doune, an historic town 7 miles north-west of Stirling, was created a burgh of barony in 1611. It was presided over by the Earl of Moray who, as the superior, had authority from the Crown to administer justice and to hold barony courts dealing with crimes and matters of good neighbourhood. Doune was created a police burgh in 1890 under the General Police and Improvement (Scotland) Act 1862 (25 & 26 Vict., c. 101). The town was once known for its manufacture of pistols and sporrans and, during the 19th century, was largely dependent on its cotton industry. During the 20th century Doune became a centre of tourism. At the time of its creation as a police burgh Doune was still a small town with a population of only 997 in 1881. Under the Act the administration of the burgh was to be carried out by police commissioners who were responsible for the cleansing, lighting, policing and public health of the burgh. Under the Town Councils (Scotland) Act 1900 (63 & 64 Vict., c. 49) the police commissioners were replaced by Doune Town Council in January 1901. Doune Town Council was abolished in 1975 under the Local Government (Scotland) Act 1973 (c. 65). Its powers were assumed by Central Regional Council and Stirling District Council. These in turn were replaced by Stirling Council in 1996 under the Local Government etc. (Scotland) Act 1994 (c. 39).

Dunblane Burgh

  • C0006
  • Corporate body
  • 1870 - 1975

Dunblane is an ancient town 6 miles from Stirling, its cathedral is said to have been founded in the early 7th century. It was possibly a burgh for a period before the 15th century, with the Earl of Kinnoull for superior, and in 1500 was given the status of a city by James IV (1473-1513). After the Reformation the town went into decline but revived during the 19th century, becoming a noted tourist resort and its cathedral was renovated. Dunblane was created a police burgh in 1870 under the General Police and Improvement (Scotland) Act 1862 (25 & 26 Vict., c. 101), but, due to irregularities with elections held in 1875, went into abeyance in 1876 and was reconstituted in 1878.

Under the Act the administration of the burgh was to be carried out by police commissioners who were responsible for the cleansing, lighting, policing and public health of the burgh. Under the Town Councils (Scotland) Act 1900 (63 & 64 Vict., c. 49) the police commissioners were replaced by Dunblane Town Council in January 1901. Dunblane Town Council was abolished in 1975 under the Local Government (Scotland) Act 1973 (c. 65). Its powers were assumed by Central Regional Council and Stirling District Council. These in turn were replaced by Stirling Council in 1996 under the Local Government etc. (Scotland) Act 1994 (c. 39).

Callander Burgh

  • C0007
  • Corporate body
  • 1866 - 1975

Callander, a town in the Trossachs around 15 miles from Stirling, was created a police burgh in 1866 under the General Police and Improvement (Scotland) Act 1862 (25 & 26 Vict., c. 101). Much of the town was laid out in the 18th century by the Commissioners of the Forfeited Estates appointed after the 1745 Jacobite rebellion to administer the estates of the Drummonds. During the 19th century it became increasingly popular as a Victorian spa resort and it remains a popular tourist destination today. Under the Act the administration of the burgh was to be carried out by police commissioners who were responsible for the cleansing, lighting, policing and public health of the burgh. Under the Town Councils (Scotland) Act 1900 (63 & 64 Vict., c. 49) the police commissioners were replaced by Callander Town Council in January 1901. By 1971 the population of Callander had risen to 14,224. The Town Council was abolished in 1975 under the Local Government (Scotland) Act 1973 (c. 65). Its powers were assumed by Central Regional Council and Stirling District Council. These in turn were replaced by Stirling Council in 1996 under the Local Government etc. (Scotland) Act 1994 (c. 39).

Stirling Central District Council

  • C0008
  • Corporate body
  • 1930 - 1975

Prior to 1845, most local administration was provided by the kirk session of individual parishes. Details of this can be found within the CH2 holdings for the ecclesiastical parishes within the Stirling Central area. In 1845 the Poor Law (Scotland) Act set up parochial boards in each ecclesiastical parish in Scotland with a Board of Supervision established in Edinburgh to oversee the administration or relief for the poor. This produced a whole new series of records related to the provision of help for those in need. As well as this function, the parish was also responsible for other aspects of local administration such as recreation grounds, refuse collection and lighting. After 1925, care of local burial grounds was transferred to the parish authorities and at this time, all existing pre-1925 lair and burial records were given over to the care of the parish council. The Local Government (Scotland) Act of 1894 replaced the parochial boards with parish councils although the system of administration remained broadly the same. The 1929 Local Government (Scotland) Act transferred the functions of the parish councils to the district councils of the local county council. Stirling Central No. 1 District covered the civil parishes of St Ninian’s and Logie, which include the towns and villages of Bannockburn, Cowie, Fallin, Plean, Whins of Milton, Cambusbarron, Polmaise, Throsk, part of Sauchie, Bridge of Allan and Blairlogie. In 1948, all provision for the poor became the responsibility of the National Assistance Board with the establishment of the Welfare State in that year.

Stirling Western No 1 District Council

  • C0009
  • Corporate body
  • 1845 - 1975

Prior to 1845, most local administration was provided by the kirk session of individual parishes. Details of this can be found within the CH2 holdings for the ecclesiastical parishes within the Stirling Western area. In 1845 the Poor Law (Scotland) Act set up parochial boards in each ecclesiastical parish in Scotland with a Board of Supervision established in Edinburgh to oversee the administration or relief for the poor. This produced a whole new series of records related to the provision of help for those in need. As well as this function, the parish was also responsible for other aspects of local administration such as recreation grounds, refuse collection and lighting. After 1925, care of local burial grounds was transferred to the parish authorities and at this time, all existing pre-1925 lair and burial records were given over to the care of the parish council. The Local Government (Scotland) Act of 1894 replaced the parochial boards with parish councils although the system of administration remained broadly the same. The 1929 Local Government (Scotland) Act transferred the functions of the parish councils to the district councils of the local county council. Stirling Western District No 1 covered the civil parishes of Buchanan and Drymen, which includes the towns and villages of Drymen, Balmaha, Inversnaid and Rowardennan. In 1948, all provision for the poor became the responsibility of the National Assistance Board with the establishment of the Welfare State in that year.

Stirling Western No 2 District Council

  • C0010
  • Corporate body
  • 1845 - 1975

Prior to 1845, most local administration was provided by the kirk session of individual parishes. Details of this can be found within the CH2 holdings for the ecclesiastical parishes within the Stirling Western area. In 1845 the Poor Law (Scotland) Act set up parochial boards in each ecclesiastical parish in Scotland with a Board of Supervision established in Edinburgh to oversee the administration or relief for the poor. This produced a whole new series of records related to the provision of help for those in need. As well as this function, the parish was also responsible for other aspects of local administration such as recreation grounds, refuse collection and lighting.

The Local Government (Scotland) Act of 1894 replaced the parochial boards with parish councils although the system of administration remained broadly the same. After 1925, care of local burial grounds was transferred to the parish authorities and at this time, all existing pre-1925 lair and burial records were given over to the care of the parish council. The 1929 Local Government (Scotland) Act transferred the functions of the parish councils to the district councils of the local county council. Stirling Western District No 2 covered the civil parishes of Balfron, Fintry, Killearn, Kippen, Gargunnock and Strathblane. In 1948, all provision for the poor became the responsibility of the National Assistance Board with the establishment of the Welfare State in that year.

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