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Authority record

Bridge of Allan Burgh

  • BBA
  • Corporate body
  • 1870 - 1975

Bridge of Allan, a town less that three miles from the centre of Stirling, was created a police burgh in 1870 under the General Police and Improvement (Scotland) Act 1862 (25 & 26 Vict., c. 101). Under the Act the administration of the burgh was to be carried out by police commissioners who were responsible for the cleansing, lighting, policing and public health of the burgh. Bridge of Allan was at that time a growing Victorian town, famed for its location and as a spa resort. Its population grew from 1803 in 1861 to 3055 in 1871. During the 20th century it continued to attract tourists and also became the location for the University of Stirling. Under the Town Councils (Scotland) Act 1900 (63 & 64 Vict., c. 49) the police commissioners were replaced by the Town Council in January 1901. Bridge of Allan Town Council was abolished in 1975 under the Local Government (Scotland) Act 1973 (c. 65). Its powers were assumed by Central Regional Council and Stirling District Council. These in turn were replaced by Stirling Council in 1996 under the Local Government etc. (Scotland) Act 1994 (c. 39).

Callander Burgh

  • BCA
  • Corporate body
  • 1866 - 1975

Callander, a town in the Trossachs around 15 miles from Stirling, was created a police burgh in 1866 under the General Police and Improvement (Scotland) Act 1862 (25 & 26 Vict., c. 101). Much of the town was laid out in the 18th century by the Commissioners of the Forfeited Estates appointed after the 1745 Jacobite rebellion to administer the estates of the Drummonds. During the 19th century it became increasingly popular as a Victorian spa resort and it remains a popular tourist destination today. Under the Act the administration of the burgh was to be carried out by police commissioners who were responsible for the cleansing, lighting, policing and public health of the burgh. Under the Town Councils (Scotland) Act 1900 (63 & 64 Vict., c. 49) the police commissioners were replaced by Callander Town Council in January 1901. By 1971 the population of Callander had risen to 14,224. The Town Council was abolished in 1975 under the Local Government (Scotland) Act 1973 (c. 65). Its powers were assumed by Central Regional Council and Stirling District Council. These in turn were replaced by Stirling Council in 1996 under the Local Government etc. (Scotland) Act 1994 (c. 39).

Doune Burgh

  • BDO
  • Corporate body
  • 1890 - 1975

Doune, an historic town 7 miles north-west of Stirling, was created a burgh of barony in 1611. It was presided over by the Earl of Moray who, as the superior, had authority from the Crown to administer justice and to hold barony courts dealing with crimes and matters of good neighbourhood. Doune was created a police burgh in 1890 under the General Police and Improvement (Scotland) Act 1862 (25 & 26 Vict., c. 101). The town was once known for its manufacture of pistols and sporrans and, during the 19th century, was largely dependent on its cotton industry. During the 20th century Doune became a centre of tourism. At the time of its creation as a police burgh Doune was still a small town with a population of only 997 in 1881. Under the Act the administration of the burgh was to be carried out by police commissioners who were responsible for the cleansing, lighting, policing and public health of the burgh. Under the Town Councils (Scotland) Act 1900 (63 & 64 Vict., c. 49) the police commissioners were replaced by Doune Town Council in January 1901. Doune Town Council was abolished in 1975 under the Local Government (Scotland) Act 1973 (c. 65). Its powers were assumed by Central Regional Council and Stirling District Council. These in turn were replaced by Stirling Council in 1996 under the Local Government etc. (Scotland) Act 1994 (c. 39).

Dunblane Burgh

  • BDU
  • Corporate body
  • 1870 - 1975

Dunblane is an ancient town 6 miles from Stirling, its cathedral is said to have been founded in the early 7th century. It was possibly a burgh for a period before the 15th century, with the Earl of Kinnoull for superior, and in 1500 was given the status of a city by James IV (1473-1513). After the Reformation the town went into decline but revived during the 19th century, becoming a noted tourist resort and its cathedral was renovated. Dunblane was created a police burgh in 1870 under the General Police and Improvement (Scotland) Act 1862 (25 & 26 Vict., c. 101), but, due to irregularities with elections held in 1875, went into abeyance in 1876 and was reconstituted in 1878.

Under the Act the administration of the burgh was to be carried out by police commissioners who were responsible for the cleansing, lighting, policing and public health of the burgh. Under the Town Councils (Scotland) Act 1900 (63 & 64 Vict., c. 49) the police commissioners were replaced by Dunblane Town Council in January 1901. Dunblane Town Council was abolished in 1975 under the Local Government (Scotland) Act 1973 (c. 65). Its powers were assumed by Central Regional Council and Stirling District Council. These in turn were replaced by Stirling Council in 1996 under the Local Government etc. (Scotland) Act 1994 (c. 39).

Alloa Outport and District

  • CE67
  • Corporate body
  • 1718 -

The Scottish Board of Customs was established following the Act of Union of 1707. In 1722 this was replaced by a single Board of Customs (9 Geo.I c.21), but some commissioners continued to reside in Edinburgh for the transaction of Scottish business. In 1742 an independent Scottish Board of Customs was re-established but was again replaced in 1823 by a unified board for the United Kingdom (4 Geo.IV c.23). Certain powers were delegated to a subordinate board in Scotland which was formally abolished in 1833 (3 & 4 Will.IV. c.51).

The administration of excise in Scotland after 1707 was entrusted to Commissioners appointed in 1723. The administration of salt duties, however, was the responsibility of the Scottish Commissioners of Customs until 1798. In 1823 the administration of the excise throughout the United Kingdom was entrusted to a single board, certain powers being delegated to a subordinate board in Scotland (4 Geo. IV c. 23). The constitution of this subordinate board was modified in 1829 (10 Geo. IV c. 32) and it ceased to function in 1830. In 1849 the Board of Excise was amalgamated with the Board of Stamps and Taxes to form the Board of Commissioners of Inland Revenue. In 1909, (8 Edward VII c. 16) responsibility for excise duties was transferred from the Inland Revenue to the Board of Customs, which was re-named the Board of Customs and Excise.

The local work of the Boards of Customs and Excise was carried out by staff stationed in customs outports or excise districts. Although in many instances officials from both Boards were stationed in the same locations, the administrative structures of the two Boards were not identical. The Customs Board established outports which reported directly to the Board in either Edinburgh or London, and which in some cases had supervisory responsibility for subordinate ports or creeks. Excise was administered by local collections which were sub-divided into districts and divisions. Although the districts and divisions were subordinate to the collection, in many instances they also communicated directly with the Board in Edinburgh or London.

In addition to customs and excise work, local officers frequently maintained shipping registers and sea fishing boat registers on behalf of the Registrar-General of Seamen and Shipping.

Dunblane Cathedral Kirk session

  • CH2/101
  • Corporate body
  • 1652 - 1957

There has been worship at Dunblane since the early 7th C when followers of Saint Blane introduced Christianity to the area, bringing with them the relics of Saint Blane. Some of the existing cathedral building dates from the 12th century, but most of what currently stands was constructed during the bishopric of Clement in the 13th C. In 1560 the church became reformed, or Protestant, which altered its use dramatically. During this period only the choir was used for worship and the roof of the nave fell in towards the end of the 16th C and remained roofless for 300 years. In 1889 restoration began under the guidance of Scottish Architect, Rowand Anderson when the nave was re-roofed and public worship restored in 1893. Further restoration was carried out in 1914 under Sir Robert Lorimer. The building is currently cared for by Historic Scotland. A notable congregant was the artist, Helen A Lamb, who was well known nationally for her artwork which included baptismal rolls, scrolls and memorials, and many fine examples of her work appear within the Cathedral itself. The Cathedral also contains memorials to the victims of the 1996 Dunblane Massacre in the south aisle and churchyard. Dunblane was part of historic Perthshire and now part of Stirling Council area. The Cathedral was part of the historic Presbytery of Dunblane and now lies within Stirling Presbytery.

Aberfoyle Kirk Session

  • CH2/704
  • Corporate body
  • 1740 - 1963

Historically, Aberfoyle Church belonged to the Abbey of Inchmahome. It was in the Presbytery of Dunblane and later the Presbytery of Stirling (for some time the Presbytery of Stirling and Dunblane). John Honeyman designed the present parish church building in 1869-1870, which replaced the Old Kirk of Aberfoyle which was situated on the south bank of the River Forth. (The old church was rebuilt in 1744 and repaired 1839). The new church was enlarged in 1883-84 to include transepts, and in 1974 a stained glass window by Gordon Webster was added. A bell originally presented to the Old Parish Church by the Duke of Montrose hangs in a small structure near the East gable. There is a two-manual pipe organ (1887) by Bryceson Brothers, London. In 1983 Aberfoyle Parish Church was linked with the Port of Menteith Parish Church.

Aberfoyle Ministers include the Gaelic scholar and author, Rev Robert Kirk (1644-1692) who was minister in the Old Parish Church, Aberfoyle 1685 – 1692. Kirk was the author of various Gaelic and English translations and publications and perhaps best known for his work ‘The Secret Commonwealth’(1691, published 1815) regarding fairies and other supernatural beings. Kirk was found dead on Doon Hill in 1692 which was known locally as a ‘fairy knowe’ – the tradition is that he was walking on the knowe when he sank down and disappeared. Kirk’s remains are buried in Aberfoyle [see Fasti, Vol 4 Presbytery of Dunblane, p334-335].

Presbytery of Stirling

  • CH2/722
  • Corporate body
  • 1581 – 1975

The General Assembly of the Church of Scotland of 1581 set down a pattern of presbyteries, and an Act of the Scottish parliament (c. 8, 1592) which finally established the Presbyterian system in Scotland made reference to the powers of the Presbytery. The Presbytery superintends the kirk sessions and ecclesiastical activity within its boundaries, and also elects the ministers and elders who are to attend the annual General Assembly. As a court presbyteries have the power of review of decisions taken by kirk sessions or congregations. Its membership comprises ministers, certain elders and (from 1990) members of the diaconate within its bounds. The Presbytery’s main officials are a moderator (effectively chairman), clerk and treasurer. Presbyteries meet more or less monthly. The General Assembly has the power to unite, disjoin or erect presbyteries. A very significant adjustment was undertaken in 1976 on the reorganisation of local government in Scotland. Presbyteries were the level below the synods, but synods were dissolved as from 1 January 1993.The Presbytery includes amongst its tasks the oversight of records (e.g. kirk session minutes, accounts, communion rolls) produced by each Kirk Session. Within each five-year period it will formally visit each congregation. When a congregation lacks a minister, then the Presbytery has an important role in ensuring that the spiritual needs of the congregation are fully met, fulfilling its responsibility for the spiritual well-being for all parishes within its bounds. The Presbytery will appoint an interim moderator to make arrangements for continuing services and the election of a new minister. Presbyteries have the duty of caring for the well-being of its ministers, and for those who are candidates for the ministry. The Presbytery of Stirling was erected in 1581 and as such it was one of thirteen initial centres for establishing presbyteries. At first its jurisdiction covered Dunblane but in 1586 Stirling and Dunblane were separated into two distinct presbyteries, to be part of a new Synod of Dunblane. Two years later they became part of the Synod of Perth. The Presbyteries of Stirling and Dunblane were later united and after 1975 the Presbytery was known as the Presbytery of Stirling.

Port of Menteith Kirk Session

  • CH3/1300
  • Corporate body
  • 1697 - 1959

A church has existed in Port of Menteith from the 13th century and was linked historically to the Augustinian Priory of Inchmahome. The present church was designed by John Honeyman and built in 1876-78 to replace the previous building of 1771. The current church features a Stephen Adam stained glass trefoil window from 1879 depicting Faith, Hope and Charity, gifted in his memory by the family of James MacOran Campbell, grandfather of Henry Campbell Bannerman, Prime Minister 1905. On the west of the graveyard is the Graham of Gartmore Mausoleum by William Stirling, c. 1817. Port of Menteith Parish Church linked with Aberfoyle Parish Church in 1983, and is currently in Stirling Presbytery.

Central Regional Council

  • CRC
  • Corporate body
  • 1975 – 1996

Central Regional Council was created by the Local Government (Scotland) Act, 1973.

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