Showing 265 results

Authority record

Stirling Burgh

  • SBC
  • Corporate body
  • c.1124 - 1975

Created by a Charter of King David I sometime between 1124 and 1127. First extant Charter that of David II dated 1360. The creation of a Royal Burgh granted various privileges to the Town including trading rights, the freedom to elect a Town Council, the right to hold a Burgal Court and to build defensive walls and gates. In 1857, Stirling became a Police Burgh under the General Police (Scotland) Act 1850 (13 & 14 Vict., c.33). Under the provisions of this Act, some Burgh administration was to be carried out by the Police Commissioners who were responsible for cleansing, policing and public health. However, they were not responsible for lighting, the Stirling Gas Company having been founded in 1825, or water, which was the responsibility of the Stirling Water Commission founded in 1848. The Burgh Police (Scotland) Act of 1891 and the Town Councils (Scotland) Act of 1900 separated the administrative and policing functions and allowed Stirling to retain its own police force. The Town Council was abolished by the Local Government (Scotland) Act 1973 (c. 65) and ceased to exist in April 1975. Its various powers were assumed by Central Regional Council and Stirling District Council. These in turn were replaced by Stirling Council under the provisions of the Local Government etc (Scotland) Act 1994 (c.39) in 1996.

Holy Trinity Episcopalian Church

  • GB224 PD205
  • Corporate body
  • 1560-present

The Scottish Reformation of 1560 resulted in the church splitting into three parts - Presbyterians, Catholics and Episcopalians. The earliest known Episcopalian church in Stirling existed in Torbrex around 1727, with subsequent churches in Stirling town centre. The records within this collection date from 1804 onwards, until 1991.

Drymen Parish

  • PR/DR
  • Corporate body
  • 1845-1975

Prior to 1845, most local administration was provided by the kirk session of the parish. Details of this may be found in the minutes and accounts of the ecclesiastical parish at CH2/1229. In 1845 the Poor Law (Scotland) Act set up parochial boards in each ecclesiastical parish in Scotland with a Board of Supervision established in Edinburgh to oversee the administration or relief for the poor. This produced a whole new series of records related to the provision of help for those in need. As well as this function, the parish was also responsible for other aspects of local administration such as recreation grounds, refuse collection and lighting. After 1925, care of local burial grounds was transferred to the parish authorities and at this time, all existing pre-1925 lair and burial records were given over to the care of the parish council. The Local Government (Scotland) Act of 1894 replaced the parochial boards with parish councils although the system of administration remained broadly the same. The 1929 Local Government (Scotland) Act transferred the functions of the parish councils to the district councils of the local county council. Drymen Parish fell under the jurisdiction of Stirling Western No 1 District Council. In 1948, all provision for the poor became the responsibility of the National Assistance Board with the establishment of the Welfare State in that year.

Logie Parish

  • PR/LO
  • Corporate body
  • 1845-1975

Prior to 1845, most local administration was provided by the kirk session of the parish. Details of this may be found in the minutes and accounts of the ecclesiastical parish at CH2/1001. In 1845 the Poor Law (Scotland) Act set up parochial boards in each ecclesiastical parish in Scotland with a Board of Supervision established in Edinburgh to oversee the administration or relief for the poor. This produced a whole new series of records related to the provision of help for those in need. As well as this function, the parish was also responsible for other aspects of local administration such as recreation grounds, refuse collection and lighting. After 1925, care of local burial grounds was transferred to the parish authorities and at this time, all existing pre-1925 lair and burial records were given over to the care of the parish council. The Local Government (Scotland) Act of 1894 replaced the parochial boards with parish councils although the system of administration remained broadly the same. The 1929 Local Government (Scotland) Act transferred the functions of the parish councils to the district councils of the local county council. Logie Parish fell under the jurisdiction of Stirling Central No 1 District Council. In 1948, all provision for the poor became the responsibility of the National Assistance Board with the establishment of the Welfare State in that year.

Kincardine-in-Menteith Parish

  • PR/KM
  • Corporate body
  • 1845 - 1975

Prior to 1845, most local administration was provided by the kirk session of this parish. Details of this may be found in the minutes and accounts of the ecclesiastical parish at CH2/1445 Kincardine-in-Menteith (Blairdrummond) and CH2/1227 Norrieston (Thornhill).

(Norrieston is a quoad sacra parish within the parish of Kincardine-in-Menteith, lying also partly within the parishes of Kilmadock and Port of Monteith).

In 1845, the Poor Law (Scotland) set up parochial boards in each ecclesiastical parish for Scotland with a Board of Supervision established in Edinburgh to oversee the administration of relief for the poor. This produced a whole new series of records related to the provision of help for those in need. As well as this function, the parish was also responsible for other aspects of local administration such as recreation grounds, refuse collection and lighting. The Local Government (Scotland) Act of 1894 replaced the parochial boards with parish councils although the system of administration remained broadly the same. After 1925, care of local burial grounds was transferred to the parish authorities and at this time, all existing pre-1925 lair and burial records were given over to the care of the parish council. Separate lairs and interments records exist for Kincardine-in-Menteith (Blairdrummond) and Norrieston (Thornhill) cemeteries.

The 1929 Local Government (Scotland) Act transferred the functions of the parish councils to the district councils of the local county council. Kincardine-in-Menteith Parish fell under the jurisdiction of Perth Western District Council. In 1948, all provision for the poor became the responsibility of the National Assistance Board with the establishment of the Welfare State in that year.

Port of Menteith Parish

  • PR/PM
  • Corporate body
  • 1845 - 1975

Prior to 1845, most local administration was provided by the kirk session of the parish. Details of this may be found in the minutes and accounts of the ecclesiastical parish at CH2/1300. In 1845, the Poor Law (Scotland) set up parochial boards in each ecclesiastical parish for Scotland with a Board of Supervision established in Edinburgh to oversee the administration of relief for the poor. This produced a whole new series of records related to the provision of help for those in need. As well as this function, the parish was also responsible for other aspects of local administration such as recreation grounds, refuse collection and lighting. The Local Government (Scotland) Act of 1894 replaced the parochial boards with parish councils although the system of administration remained broadly the same.

After 1925, care of local burial grounds was transferred to the parish authorities and at this time, all existing pre-1925 lair and burial records were given over to the care of the parish council. The 1929 Local Government (Scotland) Act transferred the functions of the parish councils to the district councils of the local county council. Port of Menteith Parish fell under the jurisdiction of Perth Western District Council. In 1948, all provision for the poor became the responsibility of the National Assistance Board with the establishment of the Welfare State in that year.

Stirling Western No 2 District Council

  • PR/SW2
  • Corporate body
  • 1845 - 1975

Prior to 1845, most local administration was provided by the kirk session of individual parishes. Details of this can be found within the CH2 holdings for the ecclesiastical parishes within the Stirling Western area. In 1845 the Poor Law (Scotland) Act set up parochial boards in each ecclesiastical parish in Scotland with a Board of Supervision established in Edinburgh to oversee the administration or relief for the poor. This produced a whole new series of records related to the provision of help for those in need. As well as this function, the parish was also responsible for other aspects of local administration such as recreation grounds, refuse collection and lighting.

The Local Government (Scotland) Act of 1894 replaced the parochial boards with parish councils although the system of administration remained broadly the same. After 1925, care of local burial grounds was transferred to the parish authorities and at this time, all existing pre-1925 lair and burial records were given over to the care of the parish council. The 1929 Local Government (Scotland) Act transferred the functions of the parish councils to the district councils of the local county council. Stirling Western District No 2 covered the civil parishes of Balfron, Fintry, Killearn, Kippen, Gargunnock and Strathblane. In 1948, all provision for the poor became the responsibility of the National Assistance Board with the establishment of the Welfare State in that year.

Stirling Western No 1 District Council

  • PR/SW1
  • Corporate body
  • 1845 - 1975

Prior to 1845, most local administration was provided by the kirk session of individual parishes. Details of this can be found within the CH2 holdings for the ecclesiastical parishes within the Stirling Western area. In 1845 the Poor Law (Scotland) Act set up parochial boards in each ecclesiastical parish in Scotland with a Board of Supervision established in Edinburgh to oversee the administration or relief for the poor. This produced a whole new series of records related to the provision of help for those in need. As well as this function, the parish was also responsible for other aspects of local administration such as recreation grounds, refuse collection and lighting. After 1925, care of local burial grounds was transferred to the parish authorities and at this time, all existing pre-1925 lair and burial records were given over to the care of the parish council. The Local Government (Scotland) Act of 1894 replaced the parochial boards with parish councils although the system of administration remained broadly the same. The 1929 Local Government (Scotland) Act transferred the functions of the parish councils to the district councils of the local county council. Stirling Western District No 1 covered the civil parishes of Buchanan and Drymen, which includes the towns and villages of Drymen, Balmaha, Inversnaid and Rowardennan. In 1948, all provision for the poor became the responsibility of the National Assistance Board with the establishment of the Welfare State in that year.

Dunblane & Lecropt Parish

  • PR/DL
  • Corporate body
  • 1845 - 1975

Prior to 1845, most local administration was provided by the kirk session of each parish. Details of this may be found in the minutes and accounts of the ecclesiastical parishes at CH2/101 for Dunblane and CH2/731 for Lecropt. In 1845 the Poor Law (Scotland) Act set up parochial boards in each ecclesiastical parish in Scotland with a Board of Supervision established in Edinburgh to oversee the administration or relief for the poor. This produced a whole new series of records related to the provision of help for those in need. As well as this function, the parish was also responsible for other aspects of local administration such as recreation grounds, refuse collection and lighting. The Local Government (Scotland) Act of 1894 replaced the parochial boards with parish councils although the system of administration remained broadly the same.

The separate parishes of Dunblane and Lecropt were united in 1898, under Order XXXVIII issued under section 51 of the Local Government (Scotland) Act, 1889 and section 46 of the Local Government (Scotland) Act, 1894. This created the new joint parish of Dunblane and Lecropt. This means that for the years prior to 1898 there are separate minutes for Dunblane and Lecropt Parochial Boards and Parish Councils covering the same period.

After 1925, care of local burial grounds was transferred to the parish authorities and at this time, all existing pre-1925 lair and burial records were given over to the care of the parish council. The 1929 Local Government (Scotland) Act transferred the functions of the parish councils to the district councils of the local county council. Dunblane & Lecropt Parish fell under the jurisdiction of Perthshire Western District. In 1948, all provision for the poor became the responsibility of the National Assistance Board with the establishment of the Welfare State in that year.

St Ninians Parish

  • PR/SN
  • Corporate body
  • 1845-1975

Prior to 1845, most local administration was provided by the kirk session of each parish. Details of this may be found in the minutes and accounts of the ecclesiastical parish at CH2/337 for St Ninians. In 1845 the Poor Law (Scotland) Act set up parochial boards in each ecclesiastical parish in Scotland with a Board of Supervision established in Edinburgh to oversee the administration or relief for the poor. This produced a whole new series of records related to the provision of help for those in need. As well as this function, the parish was also responsible for other aspects of local administration such as recreation grounds, refuse collection and lighting. The Local Government (Scotland) Act of 1894 replaced the parochial boards with parish councils although the system of administration remained broadly the same.

St Ninians Parish has two cemeteries – St Ninians and Bannockburn, which opened in 1901. After 1925, care of local burial grounds was transferred to the parish authorities and at this time, all existing pre-1925 lair and burial records were given over to the care of the parish council.

The 1929 Local Government (Scotland) Act transferred the functions of the parish councils to the district councils of the local county council. St Ninians Parish fell under the jurisdiction of Stirling Central No 1. In 1948, all provision for the poor became the responsibility of the National Assistance Board with the establishment of the Welfare State in that year.

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