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Authority record

World Education Fellowship Central Region Branch

  • C0152
  • Corporate body
  • 1964 - 1979

The world education fellowship is an international organisation which is dedicated to the ideals of progressive education. It was founded in 1921 as the new education fellowship by English educationist Beatrice Ensor (1885 – 1974) and several colleagues. Ensor had established a progressive school in Letchworth, England. The central focus of the WEF has been on child-centred education, social reform through education, democracy, world citizenship, international understanding and the promulgation of world peace. During the second world war, the WEF was suppressed in many countries around the world but were later reestablished after 1945.

The fellowship spreads its philosophy through such journals as The New Era (now The New Era in Education), publishes books and pamphlets, and meets biannually in international conferences. Members can participate in workshops, meetings and developmental projects on a national and local level.

Wood, John, 1780 - 1847, cartographer

  • P0271
  • Person
  • 1780 - 1847

John Wood may have been born c1785. The first record of him is of his marriage in Edinburgh to Margaret Norris in 1811. In 1813, he is described as surveyor at Greenhill near Edinburgh. He began his surveys of Scottish towns in 1818 and from 1819 to 1826 he published 50 plans of various Scottish towns. In 1828 he issued a volume of 48 plans entitled 'Town Atlas of Scotland'. He died in 1847 at Portobello.

The Map Library of the National Library of Scotland houses the main collection of Wood's plans but many are available online from the NLS web site.

Whinwell Children's Home

  • C0133
  • Corporate body
  • 1887 - 1980

Whinwell Children's Home, Stirling, was founded by Miss Annie Knight Croall (1854 - 1927), who came to Stirling from Leeds in 1873 with her father who had been appointed the first curator of the Smith Art Gallery and Museum. Miss Croall set up a Young Women's Evangelical Mission which provided lodgings for destitute women in premises in Broad Street, Stirling. Springfield House in the Craigs was later rented for the same purpose but was changed in 1887 to a 'Home for Destitute and Neglected Children'. By 1890 larger premises were required and Whinwell House was purchased for £950. Most children to come to Whinwell House were adopted. The home was maintained by voluntary subscription. Miss Croall died in 1927 but the home remained open until 1980.

Western Nos. 1 & 2 School Management Committee

  • C0558
  • Corporate body
  • 1930 - 1949

School management committees were set up by the Education (Scotland) Act 1918 (8 & 9 Geo. V, c.48). They represented individual burghs, parishes or groups of parishes and were composed of representatives of teachers, parents, and the education authority. Under the 1947 Local Government Act they were replaced by sub-committees or local education sub-committees, which were themselves abolished in 1975 (Local Government (Scotland) Act 1947, 10 & 11 Geo. VI, c.43; Local Government (Scotland) Act 1973, c.65).

Western No. 1 District Education Sub-Committee

  • C0559
  • Corporate body
  • 1949 - 1974

This committee covered Balfron District.

School management committees were set up by the Education (Scotland) Act 1918 (8 & 9 Geo. V, c.48). They represented individual burghs, parishes or groups of parishes and were composed of representatives of teachers, parents, and the education authority. Under the 1947 Local Government Act they were replaced by sub-committees or local education sub-committees, which were themselves abolished in 1975 (Local Government (Scotland) Act 1947, 10 & 11 Geo. VI, c.43; Local Government (Scotland) Act 1973, c.65).

West Plean Primary School

  • C0105
  • Corporate body
  • c. 1843 – c. 1991

West Plean Primary School was in operation from c. 1843 – c. 1991.

Wesleyan Methodist Church Falkirk, Wallacestone and Stirling Circuit

  • C0135
  • Corporate body
  • 1842 -

Methodism as a popular movement dates from 1738, when John Wesley (1703 - 1791) and his brother Charles Wesley (1707 - 1788) undertook evangelistic preaching. John Wesley believed that no preacher should stay with a society for more than 6 - 8 weeks; after that the people would no longer be attracted by the preaching. In 1791, after Wesley's death, the English Methodists were formally separated from the Church of England and established the Wesleyan Methodist Church. In organisation, the Methodist Church is similar in many respects to that of the Presbyterian Church. The Annual Conference corresponds to the Presbyterian General Assembly; the Synods (District) Meetings correspond to the Presbyterian Synods; the Circuit (formerly Quarterly) Meetings to the Presbytery; and the Church Councils (formerly Leaders' Meetings) to the Kirk Session. Ministers are, however, generally itinerant, the basic unit in Methodism being the Circuit rather than the individual charge. In Scotland, Methodism was slower to take hold than in England, but between 1820 and 1840 there were spectacular advances in Central Scotland and, from the 1860's, Scottish Methodism enjoyed a stable existence. The Wallacestone Circuit of the Wesleyan Methodist Church was founded in 1842, and from 1911 was known as the Falkirk, Wallacestone and Stirling Circuit. Stirling had, for a time, been in the Stirling and Doune Circuit. In 1926, Stirling and Wallacestone separated into independent Circuits and, in 1934, Falkirk and Wallacestone reunited. In 1935, the Falkirk, Wallacestone and Stirling Circuit was reformed.

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